New in my (not so corporate) wardrobe

 

 

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The diversification of my wardrobe has been long overdue, and thanks to my studies and  travels, I’ve had to start collecting a few items which have been pleasant additions that I’d love to share with you.

Just like with my corporate wardrobe, I love adding timeless pieces that can go with “anything”. Dressing up is definitely a way to express yourself and I love to keep my message consistent across all styles which is- clean, classic and confident.

 

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I purchased my latest addition which as you can tell, my Old Skool Vans in classic black and white in preparation for my trip across Africa. I was told I’d have 2 weeks to comprehensively cover trends in 4 African countries so I had to make sure that when I was working I was comfortable (and trendy… don’t forget trendy). My sister and I had recently travelled to Europe and throughout the trip, she religiously chose her Vans for sightseeing activities and highly recommended them, while I on the other hand had a few ailments around my NMDs, which came with a steeper price tag to the VANS (almost 3 times the cost of a pair of Vans)… so I though what the heck, let me try them out, and boy was it the best purchase! if you can get me in sneakers on an ordinary day, you must know that I love them and they are comfortable; and my Vans are definitely ticking this box! Thanks Ole 🙂

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I love my Vans so much that I decided to write a blog post about them, so you must know, the love is real! Plus, you get so much value for your money so what is there not to love!? oh the jacket….? that’s a story for another day 🙂

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What are your favorite pair of casual shoes that you take everywhere? I’d love to know so I can add them to my collection.

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Hope you enjoyed my post! xx

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How to wear Burgundy shoes to work

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Depending on how adventurous you are or the culture in your workplace is, one might find themselves feeling a little out-of-place if they step out of the black, blue or grey trend in the office. I recently bought a pair of Burgundy shoes from Zara which have been receiving raving compliments at work and here is why.

As mentioned before, my wardrobe consists of predominantly black clothes and shoes,  it’s what I feel most comfortable in.  However, very recently I decided to step out of my mould. My wardrobe needed some color and a new pair of shoes so I thought why not, let’s go ox blood-red/ burgundy!

Because of the style of the shoe, which has quite a low heel, I have found my shoes to very easily be adaptable to both formal semi formal and casual attires which I love. One day you’ll find me wearing them with a pair of chinos and the next day with a pair of distressed jeans, maxing out that ROI I tell you!

One of the ways I love wearing them though is with my soft pink cigarette pants (as seen below) which I pair with an off white blouse. I feel this look is quite different to my constant black, but also very soft and feminine while maintaining the professional look which I like.

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What do you love to wear when you want to take a break/ diversify your corporate look?

What would have happened if Africa was left to do things her own way?

How would Africa have turned out had she never have been colonized?

Were the subtle luxuries that came with colonization worth the price our continent will pay forever and are we forever indebted for this intervention or did we get the short end of the stick in the deal?

Traveling through Ethiopia left me with more questions than I had answers to. The main one being: what would have happened had South Africa never been colonized?

Having interacted with the locals and viewing this with a business lens when I see a big government owned distributor, banking with a local leading government bank,

It seems to me like a distorted image but why? Because I’ve been taught that competition makes and keeps a market healthy?

Seeing the locals walking the streets of Addis, left me thinking about whether working hard and climbing a ladder of sorts is actually what human being were made to do, or were we just made to live and coexist with others in peace until our time on earth was over?

There are pros and cons to communism obviously. One of the positives relevant to this post is the fact that the people are protected no matter what; irrespective of their social class, background and upbringing.

I also felt that tinge of guilt again for experiencing Africa for the “first time”, yet always being proud to say I am an African- speaking about a continent I knew little about.

The vulnerability I discovered in my ignorance left me hungry for knowledge about the history of my fellow countries which I feel I should have known, just like others know so much about mine.

I was so detached from the pulse of each country, and I’ve taken for granted all these many years, the golden thread that ties our continent together as Africans.

I do feel though that our school syllabus is partly to blame as we are taught about South Africa and our history (the censored, on the record parts)yet other Africans can writes essays about off the record events that happened to Africa.

Looking back now on my experience of of beautiful mama Africa, I realize that I’ve barely scratched the surface of her beauty, culture and history. My appreciation for the uniqueness of Africa and its people is something that I marvel at and am so proud of. I cannot wait to discover more!

Musings on my travels in Ethiopia 🇪🇹

The second last stop on our Africa tour has brought us to beautiful Ethiopia!

The most hyped up country of all 4 (Nigeria, Ghana, Ethiopia and Kenya), and with a forecasted GDP growth spurt of 8.2% (Taken from the WorldBank.org website) in 2018 I must say that my expectations were high. I was expecting to step onto a buzzing metropolis in the making…. but, not quite.

Now I’m not saying that Ethiopia is not growing, from the areas I have visited in Addis Ababa, I can certainly say that of the 4 countries, Addis had the most developments. You cannot drive longer than 1km without seeing a new development and this is a great sign for things to come from an economic growth, opportunity and expansion perspective. However, right now and into the next 3 years, I don’t believe there would have been enough time for a shift. Maybe in the next 5 to 10 years.

Because Ethiopia is still highly regulated by the law of the ruling government, foreign investment is highly regulated, barriers to entry for outsiders are high and major industries such as Banking and Telecommunications are monopolized. Historically, there has been limited to no support from the local government in order to support entrepreneurs, drive competition, increase the literacy rate as well as employment but the sudden increase in foreign interest should change this and hopefully make the Government realize the importance of working with investors and using the opportunity for the advantage of its people.

From a general, tourist perspective I could say that Addis has a quasi Mediterranean quasi Middle Eastern feel to it. Extremely dry air and dusty roads will make you feel like you’re walking/driving through the streets of Athens, Greece and the local culture, language and aesthetic of the natives has an Arabic sand dunes feel to it.

I was grateful to also have some time to try out the local cuisine which I though was simply divine and completely exceeded my expectations.

And of course…. COFFEE!

All in all, being in Ethiopia was an incredibly insightful experience and I cannot wait to see the country grow and establish itself as a powerhouse in Africa. It is certainly open for business and one to look out for in the near future.

Career advice specifically for women in 2018

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Photo by Nicola Gypsicola on Unsplash

“If you’re offered a seat on a rocket ship, don’t ask what seat! Just get on.”

—Sheryl Sandberg

On the other side of the imposter syndrome is your success. YOU are worthy, YOU were chosen, YOU will not fail and God NEVER makes a mistake.

Musings on my travels in Ghana 🇬🇭

Although practically neighboring countries, Ghana and Nigeria were like night and day.

Where Nigerians where boisterous and welcoming, I found Ghanaians to be more reserved and relaxed…

In terms of infrastructure, Ghana had a stark difference when it came to the developed vs underdeveloped areas. Where it was Commercial and westernized, you couldn’t tell the difference between being somewhere in Joburg or Accra; and where it was underdeveloped/ informal, you could absolutely see.

Airport

You don’t need Protocol here 😂

Temperature

It’s humid but slightly more bearable than Nigeria, the heat however is intense!

Food

Food in Ghana was quite different to Nigeria. I found Ghanaian food to be more nutritious as there was a variety of fresh vegetables and spices in all the meals I had, and boy did I go in with the local food!

Closing comments

Ghana was a much more chilled and orderly country. Where in Nigeria distinguishing between poor, middle and upper class was near impossible, in Ghana you could see it.

So, which country do I prefer between the two? Hands down Nigeria!!! It’s still so rugged and so African which I loved and my soul resonated so much with that. Ghana was too easy and comfortable for me so I didn’t find it as stimulating/ entertaining.

Ghanaian informal markets were my highlight so far on the trip. The experience made me really appreciate and count the blessings in my life and also gave me a new found respect for how hard-working Ghanaians are. No matter how developed the country becomes, none of the natives have forgotten their roots, they trust and believe in their local market as well as what it has to offer which I think is beautiful and truly African.

Quick thoughts about traveling to Nigeria 🇳🇬

If you follow me on any of my social media accounts you would have noticed that I’m currently on a trip around a few countries in Africa for the next few weeks.

I wanted to share some thoughts while on the road to answer some of the questions I’ve been getting so far around Nigeria and I think it would be great to do this for the other countries, compare notes of the different experiences and share my perspective as I go.

The airport

So I went to the part of Nigeria called Lagos State. My frame of reference for the post will be derived from this. I have never been to any other state and there is a possibility that you may have had a different experience to mine due to geographical location, ruling tribes, size, etc.

The first thing you will most definitely notice when you depart from plane is the humidity. Given that I arrived at Murtala Muhammad Airport, although it’s situated in the Mainland, it’s really close to the Islands and the ocean and it’s positioning near the equator makes for hot and humid temperature. If you’ve been to Dubai, it’s not as hot, if you’ve been to Duran, it’s more humid and I hear it’s quite similar to Thailand in terms of it being constantly overcast, but that could just be the time of year Im traveling in.

The second thing I can guarantee you’ll notice is the chaos. You walk out of the plane into the airport and it’s like you’ve just walked into the twilight zone. EVERYONE is shouting at you and each other, running somewhere (I guess to collect their bags at the carousel) but you will notice, it’s vibrant and it’s buzzing.

You then get to passport control and you wish to die. It’s the longest queue, there’s no aircon, never mind a fan. Natives are shouting (again) at you and each other, there’s a tribal “war” that can subtly be noticed between the men controlling the different areas and the ones trying to escort you through the “priority lane” and the faster you wish to leave the more frustrating it will get.

My experience was made so much more bearable as I had some company and Protocol (invest in protocol!!!!). We quickly adjusted to the chaos and realized the possibilities of being stuck at the airport for at least another 4 hours and started cracking jokes about Malaria and some local celebrities we had flown in with.

Top 2 tips here:

Do not check in any bag. You won’t find it at the carousel

If it’s your first time, organise Protocol, if not to and from the hotel, just get it for your arrival- it can be intimidating as a first timer.

On the way to the hotel

Okay, the one thing I must tell you here is that there is traffic in Lagos at any given time. I arrived at around 8pm local time and there was backed up traffic on the highway that I spotted as we were landing. The trip to the hotel was 28km away, Thank God for Protocol who moved all the traffic aside for our driver. It’s great.

The food

Definitely my take outs in this section are the restaurant in Lagos called The Lagoon where I tried some cheese naan, grilled crayfish and jollof rice. The view was incredible and reminded me so much of Venice and the grand canal. The company was also fantastic!

I also had time to sneak in some Cold Stone ice cream which was just Devine and totally worth all the calories!

Night life

What happens in Lagos stays in Lagos

Closing thoughts

Lagos by far exceeded my expectations. As I write this post in Ghana, I can definitely reflect and say although very loud, Nigerians are way more fun, out there and friendlier than Ghanaians (and they make the best Jollof rice 😂). I had a great time, made more friends than I can count, and my fellow Jordies made it incredibly memorable.